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LEGO launch Rebuild the World campaign

Rebuild the World

LEGO Group and musician Mark Ronson launched Rebuild The World earlier today, a campaign to help nurture the creative skills of the next generation.  It’s their first ever campaign, we like what they’re doing, hope it becomes as cohesive as it possible can – we could do with some of that right now, could the Danish brick builder offer some uplifting inspiration. There are facts and figures a plenty from the press release issued, we couldn’t decide what to take out/ leave in so here it is largely verbatim and we have a new LEGO set we want to finish today).:

Over 100 children are meeting Mark and other inspiring figures, such as 19-year-old David Aguilar, who built several prosthetic arms from LEGO elements, at the LEGO House, Billund, to explore the infinite potential of creativity.  Their imaginations will also be fired up in a series of workshops, where they’ll be challenged to rebuild the world they see around them.

“My whole career has been about working with brilliant, creative people and seeing where our imaginations take us. Rebuild The World, is a wonderful opportunity to help inspire the next generation of creators who will come up with their own ideas to shape the future of everything from the way we live to the music we listen to,” explains Mark Ronson. 

The LEGO Group believes that every child is born with incredible creative problem-solving capabilities, but we need to act now to nurture that creativity so that it can become a lifelong skill, as the future depends on it.

Inspiring creativity is more critical and urgent than ever. The World Economic Forum Future of Jobs Report places creative problem solving in the top three skills the job market will require from 2020. Imaginative play helps children learn how to innovate, problem solve and think critically throughout their lives.

Rebuild the World ad

Mark Ronson will also be joined by representatives from other creative fields to discuss why it’s more important than ever to help nurture creativity as a key skill so that the builders of tomorrow can succeed in an ever-changing world.

Julia Goldin, Chief Marketing Officer, The LEGO Group, said: “Rebuild The World is all about seeing where imagination takes us and celebrating the natural creativity of children. We want to encourage kids around the world to develop and retain these skills as they grow older.  With this campaign, we want to inspire people of all ages to play and unleash their creativity to create a world of infinite possibilities.”

Meanwhile, British designer and inventor Dominic Wilcox will lead a series of Rebuilder Workshops on the 17th September. He, along with two other creatives, will challenge kids to reimagine iconic landmarks, invent new gadgets and solve everyday problems – all with LEGO bricks. Other LEGO professionals will lend a hand, helping the kids bring their incredible ideas to life.

“Who knows what will come out of today… a house with a hot air balloon for a roof?  A car with long legs to jump over the traffic ahead? No one sees the world quite like children so we’re excited to see what they come up with,” says Dominic Wilcox.

Kids around the world can also take part by sharing their creations on the LEGO Life app or by visiting www.lego.com/rebuild-the-world-challenge. Free Rebuilder Workshops will also take place across the UK in October where kids can get hands on with LEGO bricks and learn essential skills in a fun environment.

Thirty second advert clip HERE

Created by the LEGO Group’s internal agency with BETC Paris, the Rebuild the World campaign is the most ambitious global brand campaign ever. Directed by the multi award-winning Traktor collective, the adventure follows the chase between a clever rabbit and an unlucky hunter and unfolds in the kind of world that only LEGO play could create. Every character, animal and vehicle is based on an existing or past LEGO toy, so heads spin 360 degrees, everyday objects are outsized, and a boat can suddenly fly with a little help from a palm tree.

View the full length film HERE. For plenty more insight carry on this way…

HOW WE VALUE CREATIVITY IN THE UK

Imaginative play helps children learn important skills including how to problem solve, communicate and innovate. In fact, 68% parents ranked problem solving as the second most important skill for children to succeed in the future, only surpassed by communication skills (78%).

However, the research further highlighted the need for creativity to be understood in its fullest sense, as research reveals that creativity is mainly associated with Arts-based fields, with 69% of those surveyed using the word ‘artistic’ to best describe creativity.

However, creativity is much more than being artistic, as explained Bill Lucas, Professor of Learning and Director of the Centre for Real-World Learning at the University of Winchester, “Creativity is the most important attribute we need to develop in young people today. Playful experimentation, tinkering and prototyping are critically important skills to acquire not just in the early years but throughout our lives.”

The LEGO system has long been the ultimate platform for creative expression and creative problem solving.  Children don’t just imagine what to build, they can build and rebuild.  Experiment.  Fail.  Break the rules.  Fail and Try again… This is the cycle of human creativity and the essence of the LEGO System in Play.

 

 

 

LEGO Group research into UK business leaders, parents and kids’ views on creativity

Survey commissioned by the LEGO Group of over 500 UK business leaders, over 500 UK parents and over 500 UK kids (aged 6-15) – August 2019, YouGov

  • 78% of parents believe communication skills is the most important skill for children to learn in order to succeed in their future career, followed by problem solving (68%) and teamwork (63%)
  •  ‘Artistic’ was the most common word used to describe what it meant to be ‘creative’ with 69% of parents saying it was the word they most associated with creativity. Risk-taking and critical thinking were some of the words least associated with being creative 17% and 24% respectively. Art, Drama and Music were the subjects most parents believed required creativity. Just 21% thought maths required creativity, 17% thought History required creativity and 14% thought Geography did.

 

Further LEGO research results outlining the value UK business leaders, parents and kids’ place on creativity and play:

Results from a survey of over 500 UK parents, August 2019 (YouGov)

  • 78% of parents believe communication skills is the most important skill for children to learn in order to succeed in their future career, followed by problem solving (68%) and teamwork (63%).
  • ‘Artistic’ was the most common word used to describe what it meant to be ‘creative’ with 69% of parents saying it was the word they most associated with creativity. Risk-taking and critical thinking were some of the words least associated with being creative 17% and 24% respectively.
  • 56% believe creativity is something you’re born with, with 85% agreeing some people are more ‘naturally’ creative than others. 34% believe creativity is genetic.
  • 48% believe creativity will become a more important human skill in the future, but 31% think it will be considered the same as it is now.
  • Parents are very clued up when it comes to the value of play, with 74% agreeing it fuels their imagination, develops communication skills and teaches them to share.
  • Art, Drama and Music were the subjects most parents believed required creativity. Just 21% thought maths required creativity, 17% thought History required creativity and 14% thought Geography did.
  • 54% of adults would describe themselves as creative but 56% also admit their child is more creative than them.

Results from a survey of over 500 UK kids (aged 6 – 15), August 2019 (YouGov)

  • 56% of kids aspire to have a job that allows them to be creative vs. just 6% who said they wanted their job to involve sitting at a desk. 27% would like to work with robots or machines.
  • 81% of kids wish they had more time to play with 80% saying it makes them feel more creative.
  • 77% thought their parents would be happier if they played more.
  • 44% of children agree that the world would be a better place if everyone was more creative, and 56% think people would be happier.
  • If given the chance to rebuild the world from scratch, kids would rebuild the world with more happiness (61%), more fun (55%), more trees and more spaces to play (both 43%)

Additional LEGO Research: 500 Business Leaders, August 2019 (YouGov)

  • According to “The Future of Jobs” report by the World Economic Forum, creativity will be one of the top three job skills most in demand by 2020 (along with complex problem-solving and critical thinking). 70% of the 500 business leaders questioned agreed that creativity will be one of the top three skills their business will be looking for in candidates in 2020
  • 48% agree that encouraging play in children will build creative resilience for the future.
  • 39% agree that creative skills can be learnt and developed.
  • 39% also say that their business values creativity, critical thinking and problem solving over traditional exam results when it comes to their employees.
  • 34% say they don’t think wider society acknowledges the importance of creativity as an essential human skill in the future of work

Can you spot some of the Easter eggs in the telly commercial

  1. The cut carrot
  2. Doorway of bricks
  3. The Adidas: Jeremy Scott Flame sneaker collection
  4. A spinning head that moves like a minifigure
  5. The famous LEGO ducks from the first wooden duck set reflecting LEGO’s heritage
  6. The iconic LEGO House in Billund
  7. Douanier Rousseau famous painting is featured on a wall
  8. Big Ben

About Peter Jenkinson

Peter Jenkinson
Toyologist Pete Jenkinson regularly writes about toys in national newspapers like The Sun and The Mail. This super-dad has an unmatched passion and dedication for trying and testing the latest, coolest and most interesting offerings from the world of toys.

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